Adult industry welcomes .xxx domain rejection Adult companies have joined conservative groups in celebrating an Internet regulator’s decision to reject the creation of a domain for adult Web sites.

Now just this by itself ought to give most anyone pause. Why are pornographers apparently in agreement with “conservative groups”?

On Wednesday, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) voted against the proposal, which would have led to the creation of an .xxx domain suffix for pornography sites. Conservative groups in the U.S., such as the Family Research Council, have welcomed the decision.

“This would have been a landgrab for pornographers, and ICANN did absolutely the right thing,” Charmaine Yoest, a vice president of the Family Research Council, told Bloomberg.

Right now there is no effective way to block off pornographic content from entering your home or business. Creation of the “.xxx” domain would be a huge step forward, as blocking the “.xxx” domain (at your request) would be dead easy. Your ISP could offer this as a service. The box that connects your home (or business) to the Internet could offer this as a feature.

Pornographers pay at least lip service to the notion of excluding minors from access to “mature” content. Some are quite sincere - others less so. Those that sincerely want to keep pornographic material away from children should be quite willing to move all pornographic material to the “.xxx” domain.

Once pornographic material is segregated, it can be blocked. Blocking the “.xxx” domain from schools, libraries, businesses, and homes would be easy.

On the flip side, doubtless a significant chunk of the pornographers business comes through access from those locations.

So who the heck is the “Family Research Council” and why are they siding with pornographers? Pornography is a very profitable business. It is possible the FRC is a front for less-ethical pornographers? (Don’t you just love organizations with names that tell you almost nothing, or are misleading?)

Looking at the FRC website, in no place could I find even nominal interest in the viewpoints of their members. So who sets their policy?

From the FRC website, and the Wikipedia article it appears the organization represents the views of one rich guy with a popular radio program.

While they may not be interested in your opinions, you - of course - are free to agree with his opinions … wholesale.

So either this one guy is either operating in a clue-free zone (probable), or he has an interest in the pornography business on the side (possible).

“Adult companies do not want an .xxx domain because there is no additional profit in it (in fact, there is additional cost) and exposes them to possible future regulation. What’s the point of moving an extremely popular and profitable Web site from a .com to an .xxx domain?”

Alexander added that adult companies actually want to make content more mainstream and claimed the majority were therefore opposed to the .xxx domain.

“The idea in the adult entertainment industry is to mainstream adult content to the point where it is not different from selling any other commodity, such as groceries,” Alexander said. “The more publicly mainstream porn becomes, the more money the adult entertainment companies make…Creating an ‘Internet red light district’ goes against mainstreaming adult content, so most of the producers I know were against the .xxx suffix from the beginning of the debate.”

Lets all be sure to give the FRC the appropriate credit for helping out the pornographers. As a father, you can be certain that I will.