Have to credit an article for a bit of insight - though at all not what the author intended.

There is an aspect I had previously missed. The Google Chrome web browser is an excellent platform for company intranet applications.

Lots of companies have internally-used applications. Lots of developer-hours went into those applications, and some of those applications end up being mission critical. The average level of programming talent that went into creating those applications is often less than first rate, and so they tend to be somewhat inefficient, and somewhat unreliable.

Google Chrome is probably the best platform for those not-entirely-performant and not-entirely-reliable internally developed applications. The fast Javascript engine means less efficient applications will run better on Chrome, and isolation of Javascript engines within means less-reliable applications will cause less trouble when run within Chrome.

Is this what the Google-folk expected? My guess is not.

Organizations with a long enough history will almost certainly have had to deal with vendor-forced upgrades that interacted badly with important in-house applications. The fact that Chrome is open source means that companies now have more of a choice - they could choose to opt-out of any changes that disrupt important internal applications.

Google may have accidentally created the ideal platform for large organizations that are looking at deploying internally developed web applications.